Archive | August, 2005

Reading at Catch That Beat

On August 28th, I will be reading or speaking around 11 a.m. with Clear Cut Press in the aftermath of the 2nd Annual “Catch That Beat” public house style party in Astoria, Oregon at Shively Hall (noon to midnight Aug 27th) on various early morning topics and perhaps actually reading from my soon to be released novel, Shoot the Buffalo. The context is a pancake feed. Visit the Cach That Beat 2 site for more info. It is pay what you will or can from five bucks to one million dollars.

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Interview in Punk Planet

Anne Elizabeth Moore interviewed me recently via e-mail. The result appears in the current issue of Punk Planet (PP69). You can read the review online here, or purchase a copy here.

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Snoqualmie Six Pack: 6 Writers Read at the Snoqualmie Railroad Days

Reclaim Snoqualmie from two car garages and bicycle trails and help celebrate Douglas fir, fire trucks and steam.

Join writers Matt Briggs, Anna Maria Hong, Jared Leising, Jeannette Alee, Vincent Standley, and Matthew Simmons at the Snoqualmie Railroad Days Festival. They will read at Isadora’s Books and Café (8062 Railroad Avenue, Snoqualmie just across the street from the Snoqualmie Depot) on Sunday August 7th at 2:00 p.m. (425) 888-1345. Briggs will read from his new (soon to be published novel), Shoot the Buffalo, set in Snoqualmie. Hong and Alee will demonstrate historic logging lingo. Leising will discuss the province of Snoqualmie hops. Page and Simmons will read, perhaps, one sentence stories, among other things.

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Shooting the Library

Or “Shotgun Ideas about A Centralized Writer’s Website,” is something I wrote in 1998 or so and sent to Frances McCue at Richard Hugo House and she would actually read something as long as babbly and manic as this. I just found it doing house-cleaning. It’s the kind of thing I would have put on a blog in 1998. I think it captures some of my optimism at the time and some of the heady excitement about Richard Hugo House. It hadn’t yet become the broken-spring powered mechanism that is now. The Stranger also ran local books coverage. This was also an era when librarian’s hadn’t really adapted in a big way to the web. My conclusions on this front end up being whacked. Since 1998, librarians have been one of the few professions I think to really advocate for user rights on the Web both to digital access but also to the privacy of their digital records (such as the list of books they check out). They have shifted their professional responsibilities to accommodate changes in the digital world. With computer access becoming a function of the library, the library has become a site of producing new literary text in addition to a site of consumption.

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